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On a Knife's Edge, a Post Weltkrieg 2 Kaiserreich Japan Game

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
Anyone up to vote on the proposal? I personally think it's kinda boring for christopher to make all the plans recently. Been interested in what the other posters got for ideas.
 

Eliar

Well-known member
[X] Plan Upward and Outward

It is a decent plan.

And tbh I simply lack any sort of energy to come up with an alternate now.

Perhaps next year.

In game that is. Next turn
 

Alias

Bean Daddy
Moderator
[X] Plan Upward and Outward
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
@christopher_sni. I just noticed a potential oversight, what type of weapons do you want to sell to Finland? Will there be some special discount for the situation?

Also, how will you transport these weapons? Since I'm pretty sure sea travel is kinda hard to do when Finland is being talked about here.
 

Rufus Shinra

Well-known member
Duck from the High Castle here, if I may interject something:

A) Some weapons and equipment have a higher diplomatic impact that others when it comes to messing with the local situation. Providing planes but, say, no external fuel tanks or no dedicated refueling aircrafts sends a silent message that is likely to be received as such: the planes will not be capable of doing long range raids or serious attack missions. Same if you limit the air to ground weapons to stuff useful tactically. Or deliver SAM rather than surface-attack missiles.
B) A quite reassuring thingie is a gentlemen's agreement called the Missile Technology Control Regime, which forbids the foreign sale of nuclear-capable missiles (500+ kg warhead) with more than 300 km range, whether or not they come with a nuke warhead. It tends to keep heads cooler as it's less likely a third-party country will have what are de facto strategic weapons capable of attacking the core assets of great powers (noone wants a tinpot country to have Russian cruise missiles with 2500 km range, they could actually hurt 'civilized' nations with them, and that wouldn't do).
C) As for deliveries, several options are available. The cheapest and most stable in the medium term would be to sell Finland weapons that are pretty clearly defensive in nature and have the stuff delivered using the long route by boat, possibly being open to surface inspection, eyeball-only by Syndicalist officers, to reassure them. Ideally, have the inspectors be directly in the Finnish port where the stuff is delivered, so that each crate is brought from the ship, opened in front of them and then closed again. It'll make the unpacking quite longer, but will help reassure them.
Another option, ballsy and expensive, is to do what the Axis tried IRL, AKA transport submarines. Dedicated nuclear cargo submarines could work decently and would go nicely under the pole, but watch out for accidents or 'accidents' (the kind of 'accidents' going 50 kts with an active sonar pinging your hull).

Also, I dunno if if was set up already, but wouldn't it be a good time to establish a red phone setup? AKA a telex between each of the Great Powers' capitals that is designed to be pretty much invulnerable and allow direct communication in crisis no matter what? Reliable communication avoids war more than most other parameters.
 
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Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
C) As for deliveries, several options are available. The cheapest and most stable in the medium term would be to sell Finland weapons that are pretty clearly defensive in nature and have the stuff delivered using the long route by boat, possibly being open to surface inspection, eyeball-only by Syndicalist officers, to reassure them. Ideally, have the inspectors be directly in the Finnish port where the stuff is delivered, so that each crate is brought from the ship, opened in front of them and then closed again. It'll make the unpacking quite longer, but will help reassure them.
Another option, ballsy and expensive, is to do what the Axis tried IRL, AKA transport submarines. Dedicated nuclear cargo submarines could work decently and would go nicely under the pole, but watch out for accidents or 'accidents' (the kind of 'accidents' going 50 kts with an active sonar pinging your hull).
Add another potential route. There is a theoretical Arctic route. Sailing from Japan towards the northern part of Eastern Russia and then making the unloading in Murmansk, very long, and would require the aid of the East Russians, but theoretically possible.

Another option is to just airlift them, Berlin style. Japan hasn't fielded Jet powered transport aircraft, and the carrying capabilities would be significantly limited, but it is the fastest option available.
 

Rufus Shinra

Well-known member
Add another potential route. There is a theoretical Arctic route. Sailing from Japan towards the northern part of Eastern Russia and then making the unloading in Murmansk, very long, and would require the aid of the East Russians, but theoretically possible.

Another option is to just airlift them, Berlin style. Japan hasn't fielded Jet powered transport aircraft, and the carrying capabilities would be significantly limited, but it is the fastest option available.
Diplomacy always feel like a better option, especially if you can calm down the legitimate fears of the Euros.
This is literal wanking.
Thank you for your very insightful comment, please report this thread to the mods for literal wanking as pornography isn't allowed on FiC.
 

christopher_sni

Active member
Duck from the High Castle here, if I may interject something:

A) Some weapons and equipment have a higher diplomatic impact that others when it comes to messing with the local situation. Providing planes but, say, no external fuel tanks or no dedicated refueling aircrafts sends a silent message that is likely to be received as such: the planes will not be capable of doing long range raids or serious attack missions. Same if you limit the air to ground weapons to stuff useful tactically. Or deliver SAM rather than surface-attack missiles.
B) A quite reassuring thingie is a gentlemen's agreement called the Missile Technology Control Regime, which forbids the foreign sale of nuclear-capable missiles (500+ kg warhead) with more than 300 km range, whether or not they come with a nuke warhead. It tends to keep heads cooler as it's less likely a third-party country will have what are de facto strategic weapons capable of attacking the core assets of great powers (noone wants a tinpot country to have Russian cruise missiles with 2500 km range, they could actually hurt 'civilized' nations with them, and that wouldn't do).
C) As for deliveries, several options are available. The cheapest and most stable in the medium term would be to sell Finland weapons that are pretty clearly defensive in nature and have the stuff delivered using the long route by boat, possibly being open to surface inspection, eyeball-only by Syndicalist officers, to reassure them. Ideally, have the inspectors be directly in the Finnish port where the stuff is delivered, so that each crate is brought from the ship, opened in front of them and then closed again. It'll make the unpacking quite longer, but will help reassure them.
Another option, ballsy and expensive, is to do what the Axis tried IRL, AKA transport submarines. Dedicated nuclear cargo submarines could work decently and would go nicely under the pole, but watch out for accidents or 'accidents' (the kind of 'accidents' going 50 kts with an active sonar pinging your hull).

Also, I dunno if if was set up already, but wouldn't it be a good time to establish a red phone setup? AKA a telex between each of the Great Powers' capitals that is designed to be pretty much invulnerable and allow direct communication in crisis no matter what? Reliable communication avoids war more than most other parameters.
I approve of these proposals. We can airlift the infantry and lighter equipment now and ship in the heavier defensive equipment later. We should also set up a Red Phone between the Union and CPS.
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
I approve of these proposals. We can airlift the infantry and lighter equipment now and ship in the heavier defensive equipment later. We should also set up a Red Phone between the Union and CPS.
Which route do you want to take for shipping?
 
1962 Results, Turn 14

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
The Expansion of Tanegashima and the Boosting of the Space Program goes well (You rolled a 14)

The announcement of the expansion of Tanegashima and the boosting of the Space Program proved to be a an ultimately smart move. Bigger rockets are now expected to be experimented on and sent on missions, and there are talks within the Space Program staff about doing a mission to the moon. A ridiculous proposition surely. But nonetheless actively being talked about the moment extra funding was appropriated. It remains to be seen if a spaceship has enough energy to sustain travel from the Earth to the moon.

South African government cold, but ultimately accepting of the Japanese offer (You rolled a 15)

The Americans have no concern about them, the Socialist West actively despises them, and the Japanese are actively trying to undermine their racial goals. This is clearly not a good day to be a White South African Politician who despises blacks, but while the Americans don't care, and the Europeans are solely focused on the riding crop, the Japanese are offering carrots along with the stick. They are actively blocking our efforts to create a power sharing agreement initially, but they have recently warmed up to us. Most likely as a result of their border conflicts and the Political Agitation in the townships.

In Kenya, the efforts to funnel in weapons for the Kikuyuland soldiers didn't went by unnoticed. Both Buganda and Tanganyika are actively denouncing our attempts to supply them with weapons, while the Syndetern countries are promoting us as warmongers and tin-pot dictator supporters. This has somewhat of an effect on public support for our efforts in Kikuyuland, and the only thing stopping the public from slowly but surely turning against us is our promises that Human Rights Violations are going to be monitored and punished.

The first ships embark on their long journey to Murmansk from Yokohama (You rolled a 12)

The Arctic Convoy, as is popularly called. Departed from Yokohama with East Russian icebreakers acting as their guides. The journey towards the frigid north of Siberia and Northern Russia was hard and arduous, and there 5 incidents where Japanese cargo ships actually ran aground on the ice and forcing the icebreakers from the back of the convoy to divert the path and send crews to break ice and unblock the ship. This is an arduous journey, and some Japanese crewmen actually died due to a combination of extreme cold and the hostile environment. But casualties are being kept at a minimum for the moment, and the first ships started unloading in Murmansk before making the journey back home during the summer months.

For the airlift, the lack of jet propelled aircraft and the problems it carries is becoming a real issue. While the old Japanese Cargo Planes are reliable, they don't necessarily have the cargo capacity to hold the cargo needed to bring weapons en masse, and so a sort of air convoy accompanying the sea convoy can be visibly seen. Finland's International Airport is seeing a twofold increase in Air Traffic, and quite a few incidents involving the Nakajima Transport Planes occurred, nonetheless, the Finns are getting their weapons. From tanks, to Aircraft, to munitions and artillery pieces into their arsenal.

The Syndietern has been unusually silent on the issue. Only denouncing of our efforts in Kenya and not much else. While negotiations stalled, the Airlift and Sealift operations would continue as normal.

Shinkansen pretty much set to open next year (You rolled an 18)

After years of trials and tribulations, after multiple innovations in signaling systems, railway layout, and rolling stock design. As well as a blueprint on Eminent Domain acquisition for High Speed Rail. The continuous testing efforts, crew training, maintenance and PR stunts have all been brought fruit. The Shinkansen is set to open in 1963, quite a few years ahead of schedule during a Dietary hearing in the summer months of 1962. Shinji Sogo and Hideo Shima, Sogo being the CEO of the Japanese National Railways and Shima being the project's lead engineer. Jointly announced both to the Dietary committee and the public that commercial service for the Shinkansen will be available to the public at the start of 1963.

Foreign observers are still skeptical of the whole affair. With the most notable faction originating from the Socialist West. Britain, France, the German States, Iberia and Italy are constructing massive highways that criss-cross major cities in Europe. Promoting the Car as the 'Vehicle for the Future' to the public. And the ones paying attention not being a CPS member being the Americans. The American Ambassador to Japan actively frequenting Tokaido Shinkansen viewing areas during it's construction and presumably reporting to Washington DC of our progress. Perhaps the Americans might be planning their own High Speed Rail? We don't know for sure.

Nagoya formally announces it is successfully rebuilt itself (You rolled a 15)

More good news have come from Nagoya. The city, once battered by a hurricane and a botched recovery plan has now announced that reconstruction is complete. Roads have been repaved, houses rebuilt and transport systems revitalized. Taking a step further, the Nagoya Municipal Government has publicly announced that it will be reworking the Building Codes of it's city to better suit it for Natural Disasters. This is quite unprecedented, and when the city announced such a move, nobody is sure whether or not such a move is constitutional. We might have to wait for a legal case to be brought to the Supreme Court for this, and possibly create a new city planning law that takes into account such moves. But we'll have to see.

GIDC off to a roaring start (You rolled an 18)

Not to be outdone by the Shinkansen. Tokyo's efforts to streamline all it's foreign infrastructure projects into a jointly owned company, owned by the 5 Developed countries in the Sphere has gone relatively smoothly. The announcement of the GIDC has been received warmly and the Company's IPO broke records at the Tokyo Stock Exchange. MoF, MITI and the Foreign Ministry were grumbling, but it seems that their arrogance was curbed somewhat after the GIDC's initial IPO. Soaring public confidence at the corporation and shutting them up.

Some progress on the Coastal Early Warning System, but not much else (You rolled a 5)

But obviously, not all was smooth sailing for Japan. Such progress on other front belies an Elephant in the room. An Elephant by the name of the Coastal Early Warning System. Stumbling from the door, this Japanese Government Project is finally gaining some traction, with initial tests for the 1962 Fiscal Year bearing some promises, but clearly such a warning system has a lot to catch up to. Such is the craptastic nature of the CEWS Project Management, and nobody in the government seems interested in actually fixing the issue. With all the progress Japan's been making, the CEWS' problems seems trivial at best. But it remains to be seen if such neglect will result in disaster or not.
 
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Alias

Bean Daddy
Moderator
Pretty good results for the most part.
 
World Events, 1962

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
1 January: The G12N Shouri. A long range bomber capable of traversing straight from Tokyo to California, with added aerial refueling capacity, was unveiled to the public. Production commences immediately with 112 orders placed.

2 January: NAACP President Roy Wilkins praised John F Kennedy for ‘having his heart in the right place’ in advancing civil rights, but worries that the borderline Draconian clauses in the recently passed ANSA law might deteriorate race relations in the near future.

4 January: The Tokyo Subway introduces it’s first trains running without a crew onboard.

8 January: The Harmelen Rail Disaster, 93 people died in the worst rail disaster in Dutch History

12 January: The phrase ‘Negara Maju’ (Advanced Country) was added into the list of common Insulindian phrases, when Muhammad Hatta made a speech that Insulindia will become an Advanced Country by the year 2000

25 January: Banlieue Riots, Autoroute expansions into Paris proper proposes the bulldozing of many suburban residents. Especially affecting French Commune immigrants coming from Algeria and Africa, triggering massive riots and a debate on Highway Construction and what Socialist progress means for France.

26 January: The Japanese launches its first probe into the moon, missing it by 35.000 Km’s

30 January: A circus performance in Detroit, AUS goes wrong when a famous seven-person Pyramid collapses, killing two of it’s performers.

4 February: Tony Benn, a British TUC member from Bristol, representing the Bristol Bus-Workers union, announces that in the next election cycle, he will be contesting the seat for the Chairman. Setting up an explosive battle between newly elected Chairman Harold Wilson, and the rising star Tony Benn.
  • A total solar eclipse was visible in Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Ocean.

6 February: The first case against ANSA was first brought up in district court in Alabama. The judge would state that parts of the law were unconstitutional, and proponents of the act would bring it up to the circuit court.

15 February: Urho Kekkonen was re-elected President of Finland.

21 February: Operation Ice-Savior. Preparations are being made to ship weapons to Finland. Bases in the northwestern most part of East Russia are being retrofitted to handle IJAF cargo planes, and convoys are being prepared to coordinate with East Russian icebreakers to go north once the summer months arrive.

1 March: An ANA Skyjet 100 crashes near Tokyo Haneda Airport. A rudder malfunction caused an uncontrolled roll of the aircraft, all 95 of the crew and passengers were lost.

3 March: The March to Mombasa, Kikuyuland soldiers begin offensive operations against Tanganyika to retake Mombasa, fighting is fierce and Kikuyu progress is slow and deliberate. Observers also note that Kikuyu soldiers are using Japanese made weapons quite frequently during their operations.

4 March: Basel Accords. European Socialist Leaders, after decades of wrangling and compromising, announced that a common market for Coal and Steel products throughout the European Part of the Syndietern was to be put into effect. Both Simone de Beauvoir and Harold Wilson heralded the deal as a ‘Fresh start for peace in the continent.’

6 March: Leaders of Hannover, Bavaria, Rhineland and Prussia announced their intentions to reunify Germany, a common protocol for a unified German Syndicalist Government was agreed upon by the 4 states, and the leaders deliberately kept both Britain and France in the dark about the protocol signing. Just days into the Basel Accords, the sudden signing of the Protocol sent shockwaves across the European continent.

20 March: The European population in the island of Taiwan reaches 11%, or roughly 1.28 Million people out of a population of 11.65 Million people.

28 March: An NHK special news report on the status of European Refugees in Taiwan sparked renewed debate in Japan about the status of the European refugees, while repatriation into Europe is not considered an option. Giving every European Refugee citizenship status is still a hotly debated topic in Japan.

3 April: Simone de Beauvoir, Chairman of the Comité de Salut Public, renames the office into the Office of the Chairman of the Commune of France.

8 April: The Basel accords was formally ratified by all European states in the Syndicalist Internationale.

14 April: The Immigration Law of 1962, the first comprehensive Immigration law in the Union of Britain, was formally ratified by Chairman Harold Wilson.

20 April: The first mention of a Bridge between Britain and France was first proposed by a local engineering magazine in London. This ‘Channel Bridge’ would physically connect Britain to the European Continent proper.

28 April: Just 8 days after. A local magazine in Japan proposes a similar plan, to link Busan and Fukuoka with a combination between a Bridge and a tunnel.

1 May: Norwich F.C Wins the English Football Cup.

3 May: Mikawashima Train Crash. 160 died in a triple-train disaster in Tokyo. Japanese National Railways would update it’s safety protocols into one of the tightest in the world due to this accident.

27 May: The Centralia Mine Fire was ignited in Pennsylvania.

30 May: The 1962 World Cup commences in Chile.

1 June: A little problem was published by Shina Matsuko. It addresses the problem of indiscriminate pesticide use in Japanese farms, and gave birth to the modern Japanese Environmentalist movement.

6 June: Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida gives off a speech at Camp Nerima. Praising the military’s loyalty to the Emperor and the Japanese People.

11 June: A commencement address by Shigeru Yoshida at Tokyo University was marked by his famous line: ‘Japan, long dormant, has arisen, and it will never sleep again!’

15 June: The Nord Aviation Mercure was unveiled to the public. Along with the Nord Aviation Caravelle, the French are taking a stab against the British Aerospace Industry, in particular, their dominance in the European market.

25 June: Engel v. Vitale. The Union State Supreme Court ruled that Mandatory school prayers are unconstitutional.

26 June: Shinji Sogo and Hideo Shima announced in a Dietary committee hearing that Japan will have operational high speed rail by the next year.

30 June: The battle of the Savannah. South African and Angolan troops clash in the Savannahs of Botswana, 13 South African and 10 Angolan troops were killed.

1 July: Kikuyuland troops formally enter Mombasa. Raising the Kenyan Flag for the first time in history.

2 July: In tandem with German Reunification sentiments. Brazilian Reunification sentiments are growing. Frequent meetings discussing reunification in major urban centers like Recife, São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Manaus between major government leaders are happening.

6 July: The Battle of Saint-Denis. A particularly violent outburst happened in the Banlieue of Saint-Denis, where Algerian and Black rioters clashed against police, constant protests against Autoroute construction will be a constant theme for France in the early 1960s.

9 July: The C-1 and the C-2 was announced by the IJAF to be replacements for the aging turboprop Japanese military cargo fleet. Production for 200 units of C-1 and 300 units of C-2 is slated to begin immediately.

15 July: Simone de Bauvoir would announce her infamous phrase. ‘Give Konigsberg to the Poles or no reunification.’ Shocking the German public and pro-reunification Politicians.

17 July: The first G12N Shouris rolls out of the assembly line.

19 July: The first annual Swiss & Wielder Hoop and Stick tournament was hosted.

31 July: A solar eclipse was visible in South America, the Atlantic Ocean, Africa and the Indian Ocean.

5 August: Marilyn Monroe was found dead from an overdose of sleeping pills outside of her home in Los Angeles.

18 August: Norway launches it’s first sounding rocket from the Andoya Space Center, marking it’s entry as a Space Nation.

31 August: When asked in an interview whether or not Japan is interested in building a bridge between Fukuoka and Busan. Shigeru Yoshida defers responsibility to the Koreans. Saying ‘the initiative must come from their side, not from ours. We are more than happy to fund such a project, but the Koreans must first become interested in such a prospect.’

1 September: Typhoon Wanda strikes Hong Kong, killing 130 and injuring 600.

23 September: The Animated Sitcom ‘The Jetsons’ airs in the American Union State.

29 September: Alouette 1, the first Canadian satellite, was launched into space from Algeria.

1 October: Escorted by Federal Marshalls, the first black student registers at the University of Mississippi.

5 October: The Beatles released its first single “Love me do”.

12 October: The Columbus Day storm hits the Pacific Northwest, with wind gusts up to 270 km/h, 46 people are killed, and US$230 million in damages was incurred.

17 October: By advice from the American ambassador to Japan, President John F Kennedy meets with congress in order to hash out a law promoting high speed rail development in the American Union State.

1 November: The world now has 5.000 nuclear warheads in total, France has the most number of warheads, with Japan coming 2nd, the Union of Britain 3rd, and America 4th. No other country has possession of nuclear weapons other than the 4.

5 November: Syria begins construction of it’s Grand Highway, a highway stretching from Aleppo to Sharm El Sheikh.

17 November: Dulles International Airport, was dedicated by President John F Kennedy.

23 November: United Airlines Flight 297 crashes in Columbia, Maryland, killing all 17 on board.

26 November: Mies Bouwman starts presenting it’s first live TV-Marathon fundraising show, called Open Het Dorp, it lasts for 23 hours nonstop.

2 December: The board of tourism for the Solomon Islands begins it’s marketing campaign in the Japanese mainland, promising the Solomon Islands as a getaway for the Japanese in the winter. This marketing campaign will eventually make the Solomon Islands a common getaway for mainland Japanese during winter break.

8 December: The 1962-63 New York City newspaper strike begins, affecting all the city’s major newspapers, it lasts for 114 days.

11 December: The first confrontation between Japan and West Russia occurs. A regular cargo shipment from East Russia to Finland was intercepted by West Russian interceptor planes, Japanese F-1’s were scrambled and a no guns and no missiles dogfight happened in the skies of northern Russia.

22 December: The Big Freeze begins. there are no frost free nights in the Union of Britain until 5 March, 1963.

30 December: Both the Netherlands and Maine were covered under several feet of snow. In Maine, it forces the Bangor Daily News to miss a publication date for the only time in history.
 
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Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
So how are relations between the Brazilian states and Japan? How are relations between Germany and Japan?
Obviously rather frosty due to the Socialist/Eastern divide. But no Japanese politician is actively opposing the reunification of both Germany and Brazil.
 
The 1963 Tokaido Shinkansen Unveiling Ceremony

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
Multiple streamers and confetti flew abound as you sat in your chair. The JNR executives right next to you and their giddiness can be barely contained, after years of efforts and billions of Yen flowing down the drain, it is here, and it looks glorious. The fruits of their labour and the tens of thousands of Japanese engineers, labourers, and workmen, is stands right next to you and journalists from various countries are flickering their camera lights, getting pictures of the event, and the unusual looking train, from all available angles. Nobody is missing this event.


As your Ministerial Guardsmen flank you as you enter the podium, you have in your breast-pocket a small piece of paper, you have consulted with your speech writer about this, but this is mostly your own work, you stand at the podium, speech in hand, a horde of mics present in your face, and talked.

[ ] Write a short speech about the event.

I have to include this as a separate event, the first Shinkansen is pretty important for OTL Japanese, and probably have the same amount of gravitas in this timeline too. You don't have to make your speech overly long, but please take some effort in writing this. It's a pretty important event after all.
 

Eliar

Well-known member
[x]

My fellow Countrymen.

People of Tokyo.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I welcome you to this historical moment for the Empire, a pivotal moment for the Empire and possibly the world.

Ever since the train entered our lives, 100 years ago today, Japan was a rural country, divided by natural barriers that largely defined the political barriers that seperated us for so long, that kept us weak and confined to our blessed Home Isles.

The train tore down those barriers, truly uniting our people for the first time since time immemorial. Our glorious empire was connected truly, our people finally got the chance to know truly each other, to travel, to trade, to see the width and breadth of our realm.

The train became the lifeblood that moves our people and economy, that brings everything from far and wide to our front door.

And today we witness the next step of this glorious journey as the train of tommorow, the Shinkansen, is finally a reality.

Gone are the days of coal fired coaches that puffed their way through our mountains and plains. With the Shinkansen, pollution will be reduced to a minimum, far more people and good will be carried and the time between destinations will be halved!

Please lets all give a big round of applause for the people that worked tirelessly for years to deliver this technological marvel to our people!

Long Live The Emperor!

Long Live The Empire!
 

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
[X] Eliar's Speech

The speech went well. The crowd was electrified and the train was operational soon after. It was a momentous moment in the coming weeks as helicopters filming the train struggle to keep up the pace, it's speed and reliability was a model to behold for the world to see.

And it felt good. The Socialist West was stunned by this new development. It made their car centric approach seem a bit... outdated to say the least, of course committing to high speed rail won't be such a seamless switch, Japan itself dedicated years of research and funding to make this one line from Tokyo to Osaka a reality. So it is up in the air if Europe were to follow Japan's example.

Americans on the other hand...

The American ambassador was unusually excited to see this development, and news spread like wildfire all across the Union State once the train hit it's tracks and it's speed was recorded. High Speed Rail advocates from cities like Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Atlanta were up in arms in their activism, with President John F Kennedy and congress highly interested in making a so-called 'Turbo-Train'. A train that can reach incomprehensible speeds, and can provide an easy connection between America's great cities.

Only time will tell if the Americans will succeed in this endeavour. It's certainly looking better than Europeans if there's anything to say about it.
 
1963, Turn 15

Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
It has been 2 years after the 1961 coup, and it seems like it has already been a distant memory. Japan seems to be moving forward, with industry, wealth, commerce, freedom, and equality it's new commandments for this modern age.

Also, drugs. Lots of drugs, it just so happens to be your first concern of the day!

Crises that needed addressing.

LSD and Marijuana


It isn't clear where the first LSD pills enters Japan, and Marijuana has been in Japan ever since there are people here. But both these psychoactive substances are gaining rapid popularity with today's youth, who is consuming them in ever greater numbers, either for recreational purposes, or for philosophical purposes. The changes in your perception of reality induced by both drugs is a common reason why the youth are particularly eager in consuming copious amounts of both these drugs.

And, to say the least. Everyone in Japan is becoming very concerned with the proliferation of drugs throughout the country. Nobody likes the youth taking drugs, but nobody is quite sure how they should tackle the issue. In another timeline, perhaps a simple ban could finish this issue easily, but banning illegal substances for the Japanese public risks carrying massive protests by the very same youth who are taking these drugs and marijuana, which might also bleed out into other issues the youth has problems with.

[ ] Write In

Gen Matsuda's death

Gen Matsuda was a good soldier. He fought in Insulindia liberating the islanders, he fought in Eastern India, defeating the Syndicalists and playing a part in toppling Subhas Chandra Bose's brutal Totalist government, he also fought in Siberia, braving the cold and fighting for Democracy and Liberty while the Russians chafed under the Savinkovist National Populist Dictatorship.

And he also had a good life after his time in the Army was over. He worked for Mitsubishi Automobiles. Climbing his way into a managerial level in one of the many, many plants the company has in Nagoya, he was married, had 3 children, all of them going to college by now, and on their merry way into a stable, middle class life themselves.

Gen Matsuda was found dead in the Minami Alps National Park. In his final words, folded neatly into his breastpocket when he was found by forest rangers. He stated that he suffered constant panic attacks everytime he sleeps. Memories of the brutality of the conflicts he participated were fresh in his mind, even when he was discharged and returned to civilian life, his traumas never fully left him. The ensuing special broadcast by news outlets and NHK promptly sparked a debate on Veteran's affairs, admittance to PTSD is still a pretty taboo topic in Japan's military culture, and the ensuing statement by his wife, pleading to the government to ensure such traumas will be dealt with raised some uncomfortable questions about the status of our war veterans.

This is a sensitive topic, but practically everyone agreed that something must be done about our treatment of veterans with mental issues.

[ ] Write In

Status of European Refugees

In 1949 Japan opened it's doors to European Refugees fleeing persecution from a red Europe. We admitted them by the hundreds of thousands each and every year, and nothing substantial happened, which is a good thing. Crime rates in Taiwan didn't necessarily increase or decrease outside of the norm, and the Europeans surprisingly integrated well into the new Japanese society. They bought their food, ways of thinking, and culture along with them, enriching the already multicultural prefecture of Taiwan even more. No wonder the Shakai Taishuto's presence in Taiwan is very strong.

And it is this integration that is becoming an issue in Japan. Since roughly 45% of the European Refugees on the island, and 60% of them throughout Japan, does not have citizenship status.

Japan does not have a naturalization law outside of marriage. The first non-Japanese to ever naturalize. Koizumi Yakumo, became a citizen because he married a Japanese woman. Not all European refugees have that luxury, and many of them are in a state of Residency limbo. Practically no country wants them, and forced evictions by Japanese authorities is bound to cause mass discontent on the island. Perhaps a naturalization law is in order, one that will encompass all European refugees, and perhaps all future immigrants, coming to Japan.

How the law will be written though, is completely up in the air. Since many Japanese people have visible integration concerns, and many worrying making these Europeans as citizens might jeopardize the social fabric of the country.

[ ] Write In

Action Points
[ ] Write In
[ ] Write In
[ ] Write In
[ ] Write In
[X] Occupied by construction of the Coastal Early Warning System

The Cultural Exception Clause
Currently, all trade between the East and the West is cut-off due to the ideological divide, no country in East Asia is willing to trade with France and Britain, and conversely so with Britain and France. But a rare idea, first proposed by the British Ambassador for Japan emerged.

Make an exception for products with cultural value. As in movies, theatre productions, books, music, and other such creative products.

The idea, promoted by the British Ambassador on both British Television and on formal meetings with TUC members and members of the French and other European governments, have gained traction across Europe. It will be a small, niche market for them, and also for us, but it would help reduce tensions, increase cultural connections, and help reduce potential misunderstandings between each bloc should such an agreement is signed.

The only concerns among us is that the population might get radicalized by the influx of Socialist Literature and other such nonsense from the West, we can probably make a quota system or make exceptions on some literature or so forth to reduce that possibility.

Formation of JICA
JICA, or the Japan International Cooperation Agency, is an idea proposed by Foreign Minister Kijuro Shidehara. It would involve turning responsibility for all our current foreign investment program under One Government Agency, the formation of JICA will pretty much ensure that we can further fine tune our foreign investment/ aid money since supervision of these projects, whether it's grant money for Hyundai Rotem, continued Mantetsu funding, and even Railway modernization in Insulindia would be all under one roof.

The main problem? Well, it's super tricky. Since JICA's formation would be a direct attack on MITI, The Foreign Ministry, and the Ministry of Finance, ALL of them incredibly powerful government agencies with Civil Servants that has high influence in Japanese Politics. MITI alone is a giant to conquer, MITI, FM and MoF altogether? Well, Kijuro Shidehara can handle the Foreign Ministry, but MoF and MITI fighting against your agenda will be...

Just don't underestimate Civil Servants.

Forming the MoD
Perhaps a less controversial suggestion. But the chiefs of the Army, Navy, and Air Force have all suggested that all their operations must be united under one roof. Oh, and of course, a centralized headquarters located just right next to CPS military command and Special Forces Command. A common sense suggestion for all intents and purposes. The one potential hiccup to their suggestion is that, considering just how recent the military coup was, formalizing the different branches under one roof might seen as a bit tone deaf. But other than that, this is a suggestion that doesn't have a lot of opponents from anywhere in the Japanese political sphere.

Reevaluate the Iron Triangle
A political concept popularized by the German Elite during the era of the Kaiserreich. It generally states that Big Business Conglomerates, the Bureaucracy, and the Government all have an overriding interest in reinforcing their power structures at the expense of everyone not inside of it. The practice of this concept was refined to a T during the glory days of the Kaiserreich, but was shattered when French tanks broke through the Siegfried line and outflanked the Germans in Alsace-Lorraine.

And we don't wanna end up like the Germans now do we?

This will be a gigantic effort, and will take years, if not decades, you're not even sure if you wanna go forward with this. But should you want it, passing a series of labour reforms, strengthening workers rights, create antitrust legislation (will be a first in Japan), and make Japan more Democratic is a surefire way to prevent the self reinforcing power structures in the Triangle from going too far.

The Pacific Islands University Act
Tetsu Katayama might be no longer PM, but that doesn't mean that he is not an influential diet member. And this recent act is an example of his influence. Currently, all major universities in Japan are located in the Japanese homeland (with the 1 exception located in Taiwan), this new act will grant funding for the construction of new Universities, most notably in Honiara, Port Moresby, Kaohsiung, Rabaul, Suva, and Pape'ete.

Support within the Socialist Party is high for this bill. And the Japanese public is overall supportive. There is no good reason to block this bill unless something more pressing has come up.

Electrify all of Japan's Railways
Ever since the Tokaido line was electrified. Electrification of Japan's Railways has gone on a slow but steady path. With current estimates saying that Japan would have 50% of it's entire railway lines electrified. This is good, but not enough, a 100% electrification program is on the books and gaining support with everyone. A 100% electrification plan would also make construction of future Shinkansen lines significantly easier, reducing initial expenses as well.

Faster and more frequent train service is generally good for everyone, and opposition is nonexistent. A freebie politically speaking.
 
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Jakarta

Cutest Mod
Moderator
Has there been any official state visits between Japan and the American Union?
Not yet, but relations between both countries haven't been good, the American Union State puts Hawaii as it's main crutch against us (okay, it's not the only crutch they have against us, but their current rhetoric indicates as such), Thinking that an independent Hawaii is an abberation.
 
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Eliar

Well-known member
[x] Partial Plan The Way Forward

-[x] Comprehensive plan to deal with the emergence of recreational drugs.

Ah yes, drugs. From opioids, the bane of imperial China of ages past, to marihuana, to new designer drugs like LSD.

While in ages past, when Japan was confined to the Home Isles and a few colonies and the criminal underworld firmly in the hands of Yakuza with their tacit understanding of what is and is not allowed, it would have been the easiest of things to ban everything and actually be fairly certain that it would be followed.

Alas,these are the times of the Japanese Empire, an Empire in the process of integrating its vast lands and wildly disparate people to a more centralized structure. Disparate people that have their own customs and traditions concerning psychoactive substances, or at least some of them.

Put out feelers to the major criminal syndicates, politely warning them to keep known and dangerous substances as far away from the people OR ELSE, while giving wide latitude to regional governments to deal with local customs and substances as they see fit.

Commision a comitee to examine in detail and give recommendations on the new drugs coming from East and West on your coasts, since a blanket ban would be inadvisable at the time. Opioids are a known, addictive and highly dangerous quantity, hence they are to be banned immediately. Lesser drugs like marijuana, Chassis and such are to be taken under consideration and if allowed, taxed appropriately. LSD and the likes, follow the recommendations of the experts.

-[x] Dealing with the veterans of past and future conflicts.

Despite its continuing liberazation and integration, the Army is the Empire and the Empire is the Army. When upheaval comes, be it external or internal, we all know who will deal with it, decisively.
Treating the men and women in uniform with anything less than the outmost respect and care is unthinkable. Just like the soldiers are expected to perform their duties to Emperor and People with diligence, so is the state required to care for them in all ways possible. Increase funding for veteran care and create a dedicated sub-ministry to govern and handle their affairs.

[x] Dealing with the European refugees

While the status of the European refugees is a bit touchy, considering the black past of at least some of their countries of origin and the sensasionalist blathering of far right parties, it is ultimately a storm in a teacup and fortunately happening at a time of great change for the Empire as a whole.

Neatly integrate the wider refugee and migrant question to the wider integration movement of Empirial subjects.

5 years for permanent residency, 15 for gaining citizenship rights, the children of permanent residents to be considered naturally born citizens.
 
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